what does john 1:16 mean

Perhaps John, aware of the Greek ideas, used this term to show them the true meaning of the “logos.” But I think the clear link in John 1 with Genesis 1 primarily roots his meaning of “logos” in the Old Testament (Andreas Kostenberger, John [Baker], p. 27). The word “fulness” is given to vessels that are brimful of liquor, and so is metaphorically applied to Christ, who is brimful of grace. The thought is, We all received of His fulness, and that which we received was grace for grace. The NASB translates the verse the same way. John 1:16 New King James Version 16 [ a]And of His fullness we have all received, and grace for grace. What does Jesus mean by "Glorify Your Son, that Your Son also may glorify You" (John 17:1)? fol. 1. 28. "We, Christians, have received grace 'answering to,' or corresponding to that which is in Jesus Christ. What "hour" (John 17:1) had come? And of his fullness have all we received, and grace for grace. 1. fol. Ellicott's Commentary for English Readers. The fulness of the supply is constant; the power to receive increases with the use, or diminishes with the neglect, of that which we already have. Many are the interpretations of this passage, and while people are drawn to this text, they are also perplexed by it: Faith is the hand which receives Christ, and grace from him; and the act of receiving, being expressed in the past tense, seems to regard first conversion, when faith is first wrought, and along with it abundance of grace is received; for a believer has nothing but what is given him, and what he has, is in a way of receiving; so that there is no room for boasting, but great reason for thankfulness, and much encouragement to apply to Christ for more grace, which is the thing received, as follows: and grace for grace: according to the different senses of the preposition (anti) , different interpretations are given of this passage; as that signifies a substitution of a person, or thing, in the room of another, the sense is thought to be, the Gospel, instead of the law; or the grace of the present dispensation, instead of the grace of the former dispensation; grace, different from the former grace, as Nonnus expresses it. Winer cites a most interesting parallel from Philo. Consequently, continuous, unintermitted grace. they receive not the grace of God in vain. Some "entertainers" have thrown in a twist and replaced "John" with "something else 3:16." For the law was given through Moses, but God’s unfailing love and faithfulness came through Jesus Christ. Pilate goes outside and declares his ruling to the Jews that he finds no guilt in him. John 1:16 Context. "We have received grace 'as grace' - that is, freely. The preposition ἀντί originally means over against; opposite; before (in a local sense). Observe, the word "truth" is here dropped. The chief are briefly the following: 1. Of his fulness - In John 1:14 the evangelist has said that Christ was "full of grace and truth." οὐ παύομαι εὐχαριστῶν ὑπὲρ ὑμῶν —“I cease not giving thanks for you.” ῾υπέρ is thus used, Ephesians 5:20; 1 Timothy 2:1. εὐχαριστεῖν , in the sense of “to give thanks,” belongs to the later Greek, for, prior to the age of Polybius, it signified to please or to gratify. 1. I. Because from his fulness we all received. resided among us, full of grace and truth; and of his fulness all we have received, even grace for his grace; For the law was given by Moses, the grace and the truth came by Jesus Christ. & in Num. especially Colossians 1:19; Colossians 2:9; Ephesians 1:23; Ephesians 3:19; Ephesians 4:13.) Compiled & Edited by BST & Crosswalk Staff, California - Do Not Sell My Personal Information. We have also (according to John 1:16) received ‘grace for grace’. “Whosoever hath, to him shall be given, and he shall have more abundance: but whosoever hath not, from him shall be taken away even that he hath” (Matthew 13:12). Why is the glorification in John 17:1 circular? These favors consist in pardon, redemption, protection, sanctification, peace here, and heaven hereafter. full of grace and truth.” “Of,” or better, out of this fulness does each individual receive, and thus the ideal church becomes “his body, the fulness of him that filleth all things in all.”. 44 And Jesus cried out and said, z “Whoever believes in me, believes not in me but a in him who sent me. Through the idea of placing one thing over against another is developed that of exchange. This declares that the whole aggregate of the divine powers and graces appeared in the incarnate Word, and corresponds with John's statement that "the Word became flesh and tabernacled among men, full of grace and truth;" while "ye are fulfilled" answers to John's "of His fullness we all received." 45 And b whoever c sees me sees him who sent me. ((l) lb. (Ephesians 1:16.) fol. John 1:16. We should always see to it that the life we are leading is fulfilling this purpose that is captured in John 15:16, for as we fulfill our purpose, we prove to … Herodotus (iii., 22) says that the full term of man's life among the Persians is eighty years; and Aristotle ("Polities," iv., 4) refers to Socrates as saying that the eight classes, representing different industries in the state, constitute the pleroma of the state (see Plato, "Republic," 371). Fear and love are a contradiction in terms, "for there is no fear in love; because perfect love casts out fear," A confident loving-trust in God cannot cohabit alongside destructive fear. . and grace for grace: according to the different senses of the preposition different interpretations are given of this passage; as that signifies a substitution of a person, or thing, in the room of another, the sense is thought to be, the Gospel, instead of the law; or the grace of the present dispensation, instead of the grace of the former dispensation; grace, different from the former grace, as Nonnus expresses it. Jesus' teaching on the vine and the branches isn't like most of the parables in the Synoptic Gospels, which are usually stories with one or more spiritual points. Have all we received.—Better, we all received. The men selling them might have started out with good intentions, helping pilgrims offer proper sacrifices. What does this verse really mean? Similarly he prays (Ephesians 3:19) that the brethren may be filled unto all the pleroma of God: i.e., that they may be filled with the fullness which God imparts. The gospel wants to remind us that this is the Passover, with all of its meaning and symbolism. 1. So Matthew 5:38, "An eye for (ἀντὶ) an eye," etc. 16. of his fulness—of "grace and truth," resuming the thread of Joh 1:14. grace for grace—that is, grace upon grace (so all the best interpreters), in successive communications and larger measures, as each was able to take it in. (d) That is, grace upon grace; as one would say, graces piled one upon another. Several versions of the Bible translate this phrase as ‘grace upon grace’, which, I believe, is its literal meaning. Pilate will release one person to the Jews for the Passover. John 5:1-16 The Word of God After this there was a festival of the Jews, and Jesus went up to Jerusalem. Who gets "everlasting life" (John 17:2)? Salem Media Group. We know Him as full of grace and truth, because we have received of His fullness. However, there may come a time when God will no longer hear prayers for a sinning believer for whom He has determined that judgment is due. "Grace" being the chosen New Testament word for the whole fulness of the new covenant, all that dwells in Christ for men. Of pardoning love (Luke 23:24). "To have realized and used one measure of grace, was to have gained a larger measure (as it were) in exchange for it." The NIV translates the verse “Out of his fullness we have all … So 1 John 5:16 asks us to pray for Christians who are sinning/falling short, especially where it is affecting others; these are the sins which 'do not lead to death.' Is the word ``but'' implied in John 1:17? Jesus does not stop talking in 9:41–he keeps on going and Jesus’ words in 10:1-21 function as the discourse that interprets the meaning of the healing of the blind man which is a recurring structural pattern in the Gospel of John. The view that an antithesis is expressed in John 1:17 seems to be endorsed by the King James Version of the Bible, which places the word ``but'' between the two clauses of this verse even though no such word appears in the original Greek text [1, p. 261]. 10 “Most assuredly, I say to you, he who does not enter the sheepfold by the door, but climbs up some other way, the same is a thief and a robber. ((m) lb. ‘Of His fulness have all we received, and grace for grace.’. 4. Please enter your email address associated with your Salem All-Pass account, then click Continue. Are you sure of your personal relationship to Him? The Prologue To John's Gospel 15 John * testified about Him and cried out, saying, “This was He of whom I said, ‘ He who comes after me has a higher rank than I, for He existed before me.’” 16 For of His fullness we have all received, and grace upon grace. The meaning of this, while pretty simple, is incredibly powerful. If it designs the original, and moving cause, the meaning is, grace is for the sake of grace; for there is no other cause of electing, justifying, pardoning, adopting, and regenerating grace, and even eternal life, but the grace, or free favour of God; and the one is the reason why the other is received: if it signifies the end, or final cause, then it is explained in this way; the disciples received the grace of apostleship, or gift, of grace, in order to preach the Gospel of the grace of God, and for the implanting and increasing grace in men; and grace also, in this life, is received, in order to the perfection of grace, or glory, in the other: if it denotes the measure and proportion of a thing, as one thing is answerable to another, then if may be interpreted after this manner; the saints receive grace from the fulness of Christ, according, or answerable to the grace that is in him; or according to the measure of the gift of Christ, and in proportion to the place, station, and office they bear in the church. 45. John 1:16 Translation & Meaning. . It is vitally important that you make sure it is not just head knowledge and mental assent you have given to Jesus Christ. Now in Jerusalem by the Sheep Gate there is a … We have not purchased it nor deserved it, but God has conferred it on us 'freely'" (Grotius). … Now, let’s look at the context because it really helps to see how the very text that Danny is referring to fits into the larger theme of 1 John. What "words" (John 17:1) had Jesus just spoken? 2. This idea is at the root of the peculiar sense in which the preposition is used here. From [Jesus'] abundance we have all received one gracious blessing after another. 40. The word is akin to πλήρης, full (John 1:14), and to πληροῦν, to fill or complete; and means that which is complete in itself, plenitude, entire number or quantity. Answer: We often see signs and banners at sporting events that say "John 3:16." Here, as in Jesus' discourse on the Good Shepherd (10:1-18), we see an extended metaphor. [⇑ See verse text ⇑] Doves, along with sheep, oxen, and lambs, were common sacrificial animals used in the temple. And so, lastly, notice the continuous flow from the inexhaustible Source. the word became incarnate, and sojourned among us, full of grace and truth. II. This is different from mercy, which means not getting what you actually do deserve. fol. We'll send you an email with steps on how to reset your password. Jesus the True Shepherd. Some think the phrase only designs the freeness of grace, and the free and liberal manner in which it is distributed, and received; along with which, I also think, the abundance of it, at first conversion, with all after supplies, is intended; and that grace for grace, is the same with grace upon grace, heaps of grace; and that the phraseology is the same with this Jewish one F11, (wbyj awhh le wbyj) , "goodness upon that goodness", an additional goodness; so here, grace upon grace, an abundance of it, an addition to it, and an increase of it: so (wdx le wdx) F12, joy upon joy, is an abundance of joy, a large measure of it; and "holiness upon holiness" F13, abundance of it. This was first proposed by Chrysostom. the personal and superabounding gracious experience of believers, so that ever and anon fresh grace appears in place of that already received, “chaque grâce était la récompense d’un mérite acquisx.”, καὶ τρίτας ἀντι τῶν δευτέρων καὶ ἀεὶ νέας ἀντὶ παλαιοτέρων, is to be regarded as a continuation of those things which were begun, all that was to be received out of His fulness, and, thou dost dismiss me, imposing one anxiety on another. John 16:13 What Does John 16:13 Mean? John 1:16. No truth is in precept or in parable of the Great Teacher more constant than this; no lesson is more brightly or more sadly illustrated in the lives of those who heard Him. Of His fulness have all we received. I. It means that we have received ‘abundant grace’ for all our needs in our Christian walk. The fulness of Christ. “We all received,” but with what difference of degree! Who has the authority over all human beings? And grace for grace.—Perhaps, even grace for grace gives the meaning less doubtfully. Fear, guilt, and shame cannot coexist alongside faith, hope, and love. There is no absolute consensus on what this means. 2 But he who enters by the door is the shepherd of the sheep. So here grace for grace may mean "much" grace; superlative favors bestowed on man; favors superior to all that had been under the law - superior to all other things that God can confer on men. Proud member Thus Herodotus (iii., 59), "They bought the island, ἀντὶ χρημάτων, for money." Copyright © 2020, Bible Study Tools. Of His fulness (ἐκ τοῦ πληρώματος αὐτοῦ). That sin does not lead to death. John 15:16 matters a lot in our Christian life. Notice, then, the one ever full Source. But the correct reading is ὅτι, because, thus connecting the following sentence with "full of grace and truth" in John 1:14. These are the words not of John the Baptist; but of the evangelist carrying on his account of Christ, after he had inserted the testimony of the Baptist, in connection with ( John 1:14 ) where he is said to be full of grace and truth; and which fulness is here intended; for the fulness of the Godhead in trim is incommunicable; and the fulness of his fitness, and ability for his office, as … The Greek phrasing could be translated as "grace upon grace," or "grace in place of grace." Grace is best described as being given what you do not deserve. John 1:16. ὅτι ἐκ τοῦ πληρώματος … χάριτος, “because out of His fulness have we all received”. As John tells us here about her, this is the same Mary who anointed the feet of Jesus and wiped them with her hair. Jesus draws our attention to a fruitful vine and then provides two primary applications for us to learn from -- pruning the branches and abiding in the vine. [⇑ See verse text ⇑] The ultimate expression of God's love for mankind is grace. (Comp. Pilate declares that the Jews have a custom for deliverance. This shows the English words related to the source biblical texts along with brief definitions. in Lev. If it designs the original, and moving cause, the meaning is, grace is for the sake of grace; for there is no other cause of electing, justifying, pardoning, adopting, and regenerating grace, and even eternal life, but the grace, or free favour of God; and the one is the reason why the other is received: if it signifies the end, or final cause, then it is explained in this way; the disciples received the grace of apostleship, or gift, of grace, in order to preach the Gospel of the grace of God, and for the implanting and increasing grace in men; and grace also, in this life, is received, in order to the perfection of grace, or glory, in the other: if it denotes the measure and proportion of a thing, as one thing is answerable to another, then if may be interpreted after this manner; the saints receive grace from the fulness of Christ, according, or answerable to the grace that is in him; or according to the measure of the gift of Christ, and in proportion to the place, station, and office they bear in the church. In our text in John chapter 15, we come to the final “I am” of John’s Gospel. But, generally speaking, we conclude that there sins that people can commit which God takes seriously enough so as to end their lives. First John 5:16 begins like this: “If anyone sees his brother committing a sin.” & in Num. What does John 1:16 mean? The idea of the development of one grace from another is elaborated by Peter (2 Peter 1:5), on which see notes. Question: "What does John 3:16 mean?" — John 1:16-17 NLT The point of time is the same as in John 1:12, and the “we all” is co-extensive with “as many as.” The power to become children of God was part of the divine fulness which they received in receiving him. "But when He, the Spirit of truth, comes, He will guide you into all the truth; for He will not speak on His own initiative, but whatever He hears, He will speak; and He will disclose to you what is to come. The NASB translates the verse the same way. 61. In Ephesians 1:23, Paul says that the church is the pleroma of Christ: i.e., the plenitude of the divine graces in Christ is communicated to the Church as His body, making all the body, supplied and knit together through the joints and bands, to increase with the increase of God (Colossians 2:19; compare Ephesians 4:16). Take grace for LOVE, so there is a fulness of love in Christ. John’s Balancing Act. Answer: “For from [Christ’s] fullness we have all received, grace upon grace” (John 1:16, ESV). Here it means the plenitude of divine attributes, the “glory . 46 d I have come into the world as light, so that whoever believes in me may not remain in darkness. (k) Zohar in Exod. These 17 verses aren't long, … James White (This information sheet is divided into two sections – the first explores the meaning of John 1:1, and the second addresses the more technical subject of the correct translation of the verse. ‘Of His fulness have all we received.’, III. Money-changing into local currency was a … The Passover feast was a memorial for God’s deliverance. He needs the complete surrender of your heart and life so that you may be truly born again. Article Images Copyright © 2020 Getty Images unless otherwise indicated. That incident does not take place until the next chapter; John is anticipating it here because he wants us to understand which of the various Marys around Jesus this truly was. Greek : hoti ek tou pleromatos autou hemeis pantes elabomen, (1PAAI) kai charin anti charitos; Amplified : For out of His fullness (abundance) we have all received [all had a share and we were all supplied with] one grace after another and spiritual blessing upon spiritual blessing and even favor upon favor and gift [heaped] upon gift. The meaning is, probably, simply that we have received through him "abundance" of grace or favor. The words of our text are some of the most familiar words in the Gospel of John, but this does not necessarily mean they are well understood. What instances of its meaning must have crowded on the writer’s mind in the nation, in the disciples, in the Twelve, and even in the differing power of perception in the inner circle of the Three! It tells the very purpose for which Jesus Christ has called some people to Himself to become Christians. Use this table to get a word-for-word translation of the original Greek Scripture. These and the succeeding words are the Evangelist's, not the Baptist's. 13 Which were born, not of blood, nor of the will of the flesh, nor of the will of man, but of God. 69. The words mean “grace in exchange for, instead of, grace.” The fulness of the supply is constant; the power to receive increases with the use, or diminishes with the neglect, of that which we already have. fol. Fulness is a technical theological term, meeting us again in this sense in the Epistles to, as here in the Gospel from, the Asiatic Churches. All rights reserved. Grace for grace - Many interpretations of this phrase have been proposed. 3 To him the doorkeeper opens, and the sheep hear his voice; and he calls his own sheep by name and leads them out. The Hebrews, in expressing the superlative degree of comparison, used simply to repeat the word - thus, "pits, pits," meaning many pits (Hebrew in Genesis 14:10). John 3:16 says, “For God so loved the world that He gave His one and only Son, that whoever believes in Him shall not perish but have eternal life.” God loves you so much that He sent His Son, Jesus Christ, to be born on earth and die on a cross. John 1:1 – Meaning and Translation. The exposition belongs to the Notes on these passages. Pilate’s discussion with Jesus has been unproductive in his own eyes. Notice the leading question Pilate asks: “Do you want me to release to you t… Hence John's meaning here is that Christians receive from the divine completeness whatever each requires for the perfection of his character and for the accomplishment of his work (compare John 15:15; John 17:22). (9) Christ is the most plentiful fountain of all goodness, but he gave out his gifts most bountifully at that time when he exhibited and showed himself to the world. 15 John bare witness of him, and cried, saying, This was he of whom I spake, He that cometh after me is preferred before me: for he was before me. The word fullness (πλήρωμα) is found here only in John, but frequently occurs in the writings of Paul, whose use of it in Ephesians and Colossians illustrates the sense in John; these being Asiatic churches which fell, later, within the sphere of John's influence. More closely related to John's use of the term here are Colossians 1:19, "It pleased the Father that in Him (Christ) should all the fullness (τὸ πλήρωμα, note the article) dwell;" and Colossians 2:9, Colossians 2:10, "In Him dwelleth all the pleroma of the Godhead bodily (i.e., corporally, becoming incarnate), and in Him ye are fulfilled (πεπληρωμένοι)." Thus the crew of a ship is called πλήρωμα, its complement. Consider, then, again, the many receivers from the one Source. 14 And the Word was made flesh, and dwelt among us, (and we beheld his glory, the glory as of the only begotten of the Father,) full of grace and truth. "Wherefore, having provided and dispensed the first graces (χάριτας), before their recipients have waxed wanton through satiety, he subsequently bestows different graces in exchange for (ἀντὶ) those, and a third supply for the second, and ever new ones in exchange for the older.". Wrongly so, John 3:16 is often written as graffiti on highway overpasses. & 71. of What does John 2:16 mean? What is Jesus doing in John 17:1? And of his fulness have all we received These are the words not of John the Baptist; but of the evangelist carrying on his account of Christ, after he had inserted the testimony of the Baptist, in connection with ( John 1:14 ) where he is said to be full of grace and truth; and which fulness is here intended; for the fulness of the Godhead in trim is incommunicable; and the fulness of his fitness, and ability for his office, as Mediator, was for himself; but his fulness of grace and truth is dispensatory, and is in him, on purpose to be communicated unto others: and "of it", the evangelist says, "have all we received"; not all mankind, though they all receive natural light and life from trim; nor merely all the prophets of the Old Testament, though they had their gifts and grace from him, who then was, as now, the head of the church; nor only all the apostles of Christ, though these may be principally intended; but all believers, who, though they have not all the same measure of grace, nor the same gifts, yet all have received something: nor is there any reason for discouragement, envy, or reproach. John 1:16 For of His fullness we have all received, and grace upon grace. When on earth He did not pardon once, but again and again, and that without upbraiding. The original faculty of reception was itself a free gift, and in the use of this grace there was given the greater power. We received, not New Testament grace instead of Old Testament grace; nor simply, grace added to grace; but new grace imparted as the former measure of grace has been received and improved. Eighteen inches can mean an eternity with Christ or an eternity with- out Christ. The ὅτι does not continue the Baptist’s testimony, but refers to πλήρης in John 1:14. Rev., we received: rendering the aorist tense more literally. "We have received under the gospel, grace or favor, 'instead of' those granted under the law; and God has added by the gospel important favors to those which he gave under the law." 2. The meaning of verses 16 and 17 is debated among Christians. Aristophanes ("Wasps," 660), "τούτων πλήρωμα, the sum-total of these, is nearly two thousand talents." 2. The words mean "grace in exchange for, instead of, grace." We are 'like' him in meekness, humility," etc. Good News Translation w/ Apocrypha Chapter Parallel 17 All unrighteousness is sin, and there is a sin not leading to death," (1 John 5:16-17). 3. Some think the phrase only designs the freeness of grace, and the free and liberal manner in which it is distributed, and received; along with which, I also think, the abundance of it, at first conversion, with all after supplies, is intended; and that grace for grace, is the same with grace upon grace, heaps of grace; and that the phraseology is the same with this Jewish one (k), , "goodness upon that goodness", an additional goodness; so here, grace upon grace, an abundance of it, an addition to it, and an increase of it: so (l), joy upon joy, is an abundance of joy, a large measure of it; and "holiness upon holiness" (m), abundance of it. John 1:16 (GNT) Out of the fullness of his grace he has blessed us all, giving us one blessing after another. 3.

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